Update: 2012-12-31 11:48 PM +0630

TIL

Myanmar Medicinal Plant Database

Family: Amaranthaceae

compiled by U Kyaw Tun, U Pe Than, and staff of TIL. Not for sale.

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Family: Amaranthaceae 3 entries
Amaranthus caudatus {krak-mauk-pan:ping}
Amaranthus peniculatus {hing:nu.n}
Amaranthus spinosus  {hing:nu.n hsu:pauk}
Amaranthus spp.

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Amaranthus caudatus

Family: Amaranthaceae

Entered as: {krak-mauk-pan:ping}

Burmese-Myanmar transcript names:
Agri.Dept.2000 08-0202:  {krak-mauk}
Chklist: Kyet-mauk
LSR : NL
FAO : NL
KS-TMN : NL
Nagathein : NL
UHM : NL

 

Myanmar-Script Spelling
{krak-mauk} - n. -- MMDict 032 gives 2 definitions:
  1.
  2.
  UKT: MMDict 032
  def.1 is for a plant bearing a tasty fruit with rind covered with hairs.
  def. 2 is for a plant bearing a flower resembling a coxcomb.
{krak-mauk} /|kje' mau'|/ - n. -- MEDict 042
  1. cock's comb
  2. coxcomb, love-lies-bleeding. Amaranthus caudatus  
  3. rambutan. N. lappaceum

UKT: To differentiate N. lappaceum and A. caudatus, from one another, MMPDB has to adopt the names:
{krak-mauk-pan: ping} for A. caudatus (fam. Amaranthaceae), and
{krak-mauk-thi: ping} for N. lappaceum

Data above updated (070309) in Akshara index r1c1kaM.htm

Chklist data: 060716
Amaranthus caudatus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Cultivated. Common Names: Kyet-mauk, Love lies bleeding

Hindi :
Sanskrit

 

English common name used in Myanmar :
Agri.Dept.2000 08-0202: love-lies-bleeding
LSR : NL
FAO : NL
KS-TMN : NL
Nagathein : NL
UHM : NL

 

Picture :
Leader: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/consumer/factsheets/annuals/loveliesbleeding.html
Photo left: Leaves and inflorescence -- http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/7583/
Photo right: Leaves and inflorescence -- http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=dl&enlarge=0000+0000+0105+1373

 

Plant identification characters :

 

Distribution in Myanmar :

 

Part used and uses :

Weed and cultivated ornamental. Formally grown as grain crop by the Incas but displaced by Colonists' cereals. Leaves used like spinach. -- http://www.fao.org/ag/AGA/AGAP/frg/afris/Data/572.HTM

For many centuries, the leaves and seeds of Amaranthus species have been sources of food for native people from North and South America to Asia, India, Africa, the Pacific Islands, the Caribbean region, and Eurasia. Amaranth was the principal grain crop of the Aztecs and known as the golden grain of the gods until all the fields and seeds were destroyed by the Spanish Conquistadors. The following are the words of more knowledgeable specialists than Iand better writersfrom Lost Crops of the Incas: Little-Known Plants of the Andes with Promise for Worldwide Cultivation, produced by an Ad Hoc Panel of the National Research Council led by Noel Vietmeyer and published in 1989 by the National Academy Press in Washington, D.C. (available for reading online at http://books.nap.edu/books/030904264X/html/R1.html#pagetop):
   A staple grain of the Incas, Aztecs, and other pre-Columbian peoples, amaranth was once almost as widely dispersed throughout the Americas as corn. The most important Andean species is Amaranthus caudatus. In Quechua, the ancient Inca language that is still spoken in the Andes, it is called kiwicha (pronounced kee-wee-cha).
   Kiwicha is one of the prettiest crops on earth; the beautiful colors of its broad leaves, stems, and flowerspurple, red, goldcreate fiery fields that blaze across the mountainsides. The plant grows vigorously, tolerates drought, heat, and pests, and adapts readily to new environments, including some that are inhospitable to conventional grain crops. Nonetheless, it is little known outside the highland regions of Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and northwestern Argentina.
   Kiwichas grains are scarcely bigger than poppy seeds. However, they occur in huge numberssometimes more than 100,000 to a plant. Like other amaranth grains, they are flavorful and, when heated, they pop to produce a crunchy white product that tastes like a nutty popcorn. Light and crisp, it is delicious as a snack, as a cold cereal with milk and honey, as a breading on chicken or fish, or in sweets with a whisper of honey. The grain is also ground into flour, rolled into flakes, puffed, or boiled for porridge. Because of its high nutritional value, it is considered especially good for children, invalids, and the elderly.
   These seeds are one of the most nutritious foods grown. Not only are they richer in protein than the major cereals, but the amino acid balance of their protein comes closer to nutritional perfection for the human diet than that in normal cereal grains.
   So there you have it. An ornamental, not to my taste but perhaps to yours, which turns out to be possibly invasive in that role and yet very useful as a food source for the worlds future. A few thousand acres of amaranth are grown today in the United States. Do a little digging about amaranthhere and abroadand youll uncover a fascinating tale of production techniques, sustainability, biodiversity, food production, and agriculture markets. -- http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/homehort/plant/amaranthaceae.htm

 

Constituents :

 

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Amaranthus peniculatus

Family: Amaranthaceae

{hing:nu.n}

Burmese-Myanmar transcript names:
Agri.Dept.2000 62-1667:  {hing:nu.n}
Chklist: Hin-nu-nwe
LSR : NL
FAO : NL
KS-TMN : NL
Nagathein NL:
UHM : NL

Myanmar-Script Spelling
{hing:nu.n} - --MMDict 344
{hing:nu.n} /|hin: nu. ne|/ - n. species of amaranth used as a vegetable, Amaranthus bliturnA. peniculatus -- MEDict 531

Data above updated (070309) in Akshara index r4c2ha.htm

UKT: Formerly spelled as {hing:nu.nw} -- see LSR 473 and Nagathein 4-407. {hing:nu.nw} is a favorite vegetable, especially for Myanmars exposed to Indian dishes, for stir-frying with curry powder. The species with the suffix {hsu:pauk} meaning "thorns" is not generally eaten.

Chklist data: 060716
Amaranthus paniculatus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Reported from Myanmar. Common Names: Hin-nu-nwe

Hindi :
Sanskrit :

 

English common name used in Myanmar :
Agri.Dept.2000 62-1667:  Amaranth
LSR : NL
FAO : NL
KS-TMN : NL
Nagathein NL:
UHM : NL

 

Picture :
Leader: both photos from: http://www.biopix.dk/PhotosSmall/Amaranthus%20paniculatus%20(Cultiv)%2000004.JPG
Photo: Amaranthus paniculatus (Amaranthus sp. 'intense purple') -- http://tomclothier.hort.net/photoalb.html

Plant identification characters :

 

Distribution in Myanmar :

 

Part used and uses :

 

Constituents :

 

Contents of this page

Amaranthus spinosus

Family: Amaranthaceae

Burmese-Myanmar transcript names:
Agri.Dept.2000 62-1668:  {hing:nu.n hsu:pauk}
Chklist: Hin-nu-nwe-subauk
LSR 473: {hing:nu.n hsu:pauk}
FAO : NL
KS-TMN 037: Hin-nu-nwe-su-bauk
Nagathein 4-407: {hing:nu.n hsu:pauk}
UHM : NL

Myanmar-Script Spelling
NL in MMDict
{hing:nu.n hsu:pauk} /|hin: nu. ne hsu: bau'|/ - n. prickly amaranth, Amaranthus spinosus  -- MEDict531

Data above updated (070309) in Akshara index r4c2ha.htm

UKT: Formerly spelled as {hing:nu.nw} -- see LSR 473 and Nagathein 4-407. {hing:nu.nw} is a favorite vegetable, especially for Myanmars exposed to Indian dishes, for stir-frying with curry powder. The species with the suffix {hsu:pauk} meaning "thorns" is not generally eaten. {hing:nu.n hsu:pauk} as medicine is prepared from a freshly uprooted plant (whole plant with leaves, stems, and roots) is boiled with water and concentrated down to 1/3 the original volume, and is generally taken 3 times a day.

Chklist data: 060716
Amaranthus spinosus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Cultivated. Common Names: Hin-nu-nwe-subauk, Spiny amaranthus

Hindi
{ba.hu.di~r-ya.} -- Nagathein
Sanskrit

 

English common name used in Myanmar :
Agri.Dept.2000 -- Prickly amaranth
LSR : Prickly amaranth
FAO -- NL
KS-TMN -- Prickly amaranth
Nagathein --  Not given
UHM -- NL

Picture

Leader from: http://plants.usda.gov/gallery/standard/amsp_001_svd.jpg

Photos: left -- habit with flowers and fruits, right -- wild growing plants

 

Plant identification characters

An annual herb, erect; branches diffuse, stems hard, grooved, spines sharp, straight and divaricate in leaf axils. Leaves alternate, simple; exstipulate; petioles long, equalling the laminae or shorter; laminae ovate or lanceolate or oblong, the bases obtuse, the margins entire, the tips spinous -apiculate, the upper surfaces glabrous, the lower sometimes scurfy. Inflorescences axillary cymules, dense and clustered or terminal and axillary spikes, dense or interrupted; bracts scarious. Flowers small, bracteoles linear, bristle-pointed, sessile, unisexual, monoecious, actinomorphic, pentamerous, hypogynous. Staminate flower: perianth uniseriate, sepals 5, ovate, acuminate, bristle-pointed. Androceium polyandrous, stamens 5, opposite the sepals, the filaments filiform, the anthers dithecous, dehiscence longitudinal. Pistillate flower: perianth uniseriate, sepals 5, oblong, obtuse, apiculate. Pistil 1, ovary ovoid, compressed, 2- carpelled, syncarpous, 1- loculed, the ovule solitary, erect, the placentation basal, the styles 2, short, the stigmas 2. Fruit a capsule, ovoid, thickened at the top, dehiscence circumscissile about the middle, membranous, rugose; seeds globose, erect, compressed, testa crustaceous, endospermic, albumen floury. Flowering period: July-November. Fruiting period: August-December. -- KS-TMN

  {hing:nu.nw-hsu:pauk} is a large species of {hing:nu.nw}. Since it is a well-known plant, we need not elaborate. -- Nagathein, free translation by UKT.

 

Distribution in Myanmar
A weed, common throughout Myanmar in waste land places -- KS-TMN

Part used and uses
Roots, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds -- Antidote for snake-bites. Root -- Antidote for scorpion-stings; Muscle spasticity; Dermatitis. Root decoction -- Haematemesis; Menorrhagia; Leucorrhoea; Heals boils and sores. Leaf  -- Dysuria; Gonorrhoea; Urolithiasis; Hepatitis; Haemorrhoids; Stops epistaxis; Antidote for spider toxin. -- KS-TMN

 

Constituents

 

Contents of this page

Amaranthus spp.

Family: Amaranthaceae

See also Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaranth 121231

Results of search for 'Amaranthus' in the Checklist of Plants of Myanmar, U.S. National Herbarium, 16 Jul 2006.
Amaranthus blitoides S. Wats. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Wide. Common Names: Hinka-nwe, Hin-nu-nwe, Phat-khun-khaik
Amaranthus caudatus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Cultivated. Common Names: Kyet-mauk, Love lies bleeding
Amaranthus gangeticus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Cultivated. Common Names: Grain amaranth, Hin-nu-nwe
Amaranthus mangostanus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Wide. Common Names: Hin-nu-nwe
Amaranthus paniculatus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Reported from Myanmar. Common Names: Hin-nu-nwe
Amaranthus spinosus L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Cultivated. Common Names: Hin-nu-nwe-subauk, Spiny amaranthus
Amaranthus tricolor L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Cultivated. Common Names: Hin-nu-nwe-ywet-hla, Joseph's coat
Amaranthus viridis L. Habit: Herb. Distribution: Yangon. Common Names: Hin-nu-nwe

Contents of this page

Entry format: Botanical name / Family / Ref. Burmese-Myanmar transcripts Agri.Dept.2000 : Chklist: LSR : FAO : KS-TMN: Nagathein : UHM :/ Myanmar-Script Spelling ( Official Myanmar Dictionaries : - TravPo-M-Dict - Myan-Engl-Dict - Myan-Ortho / Chklist data / Hindi / Sanskrit / English common name used in Myanmar / Picture / Plant identification characters / Distribution in Myanmar / Part used and uses / Constituents /
End of TIL file